Actor's brain tumour ordeal

By Ted JeoryFORMER EastEnders star Ross Davidson will learn today whether a lengthy operation to remove a brain tumour has been successful.The Frinton actor, best known for playing nurse Andy O'Brien in the long-running BBC soap, said he was nervous ahead of a meeting with cancer specialists tonight, but was hopeful the tumour would prove to be benign.

By Ted Jeory

FORMER EastEnders star Ross Davidson will learn today whether a lengthy operation to remove a brain tumour has been successful.

The Frinton actor, best known for playing nurse Andy O'Brien in the long-running BBC soap, said he was nervous ahead of a meeting with cancer specialists tonight, but was hopeful the tumour would prove to be benign.

Mr Davidson, 55, said he had been terrified he might die after he collapsed with a mini stroke the morning after playing squash a few weeks ago.


You may also want to watch:


He was treated at Colchester General Hospital and Oldchurch Hospital in Romford, where detailed scans revealed he had a brain tumour.

Mr Davidson said his collapse had come “out of the blue”, but believed it could have been triggered after making a heroic citizen's arrest four years ago.

Most Read

“I was up north filming Hollyoaks when I was smashed on the back of the head with a bottle from behind,” he said.

“I got the bloke and arrested him, but it left me with 23 stitches in my neck and eight on my wrist. That was the only real time I can remember my head taking a heavy blow.

“The doctors said they don't know the cause of it, but they don't believe it was playing squash.”

Six hours of surgery has left Mr Davidson with a seven-inch scar on the back of his head and prompted him to re-evaluate his life.

Having been at the forefront of a campaign to save the special needs Leas School in Clacton, where his seven-year-old son Drew goes, Mr Davidson said his family was the most important thing to him.

“I live in a beautiful place and I want to spend more time here. I've been a workaholic over the years, but I don't really have to work any more,” he added.

“I'm strong in myself and I've had friends offering much support. Drew knows I'm ill, but he doesn't really understand the full extent. Life is extremely precious.”

Paul Honywell, chairman of the Leas Parent Action Group, said: “He's an inspiration to us all and the children.

“Only two weeks ago, he was standing protesting outside the school gates with us and talking about his situation.

“He'd been in hospital for a week and was due to go back in on the Monday. He was as cheerful as ever, but I think he was putting a brave face on it.

“He's had quite run of bad luck what with the school saga and now his health - we all wish him the best of luck.”

ted.jeory@eadt.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter