Brave horse owner remembered at funeral

THE horse which made a Suffolk woman's dream come true in the last few hours of her life has played a key role in her funeral.Tracey Kemp, 36, died on Sunday at St Nicholas Hospice in Bury St Edmunds after fighting breast cancer for 15 months.

THE horse which made a Suffolk woman's dream come true in the last few hours of her life has played a key role in her funeral.

Tracey Kemp, 36, died on Sunday at St Nicholas Hospice in Bury St Edmunds after fighting breast cancer for 15 months.

Mourners yesterday were led through Meddler Stud in Kentford to witness Tracey's horse Daggers Canyon and Malaah, which raced for Tracey on Saturday , decked in her racing colours.

Husband Stuart said: "Horse racing was her life - she worked on a racecourse, she had her own two-year-old horse and her whole social life was geared around racing.


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"She was the most easy-going and friendly person you could ever wish to meet. I will miss most her friendship and companionship - she was such a lovely person.

"She was full of life and everything that is now being done for her is a reflection on the sort of person she was."

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One of Tracey's racing ambitions was achieved when Malaah, owned by the Kentford stud, lined up in the first ever greys-only race at Newmarket.

The stud, where Mr Kemp works, agreed to hand over ownership of the horse for the SportingOdds.com Grey Horse Handicap.

Mr Kemp said: "Saturday was a massive thrill for her and a really special day."

Tracey, who worked for the Tote at the town's Rowley Mile and July courses, was diagnosed with breast cancer in May, last year, after her husband bought her the surprise gift of a two-year-old colt Daggers Canyon.

Mr Kemp, who lives in Stradishall, said he hoped the horse would start racing at the end of the year.

The funeral was held at West Suffolk Crematorium where a spokeswoman said: "It all seemed to go well. There was a nice crowd of people and their own particular music was played."

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