Brewer to axe raunchy cocktail names

A SUFFOLK brewer which sparked complaints with a risqué ad campaign is enforcing a crackdown on cocktails with sexy names – instead giving them "legitimate" alternatives.

A SUFFOLK brewer which sparked complaints with a risqué ad campaign is enforcing a crackdown on cocktails with sexy names - instead giving them "legitimate" alternatives.

Greene King's 750-strong pub chain will rename traditional favourites such as Sex on the Beach as part of a policy to promote its alcohol in a "responsible way."

Officials with the Bury St Edmunds-based brewing giant say all of its outlets will give products "legitimate" names so its brands are not associated with promiscuity, machismo or anti-social behaviour.

A company spokesman said yesterday: "It is Greene King Pub Company policy to advertise all alcohol in a responsible manner and never to associate it with sexual promiscuity, machismo, anti-social behaviour or illegal acts.


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"Drinks and cocktails will only ever be given 'legitimate' names and the company will not sell any non-Portman Group approved products.

"Greene King Pub Company is currently working to ensure this policy is enforced throughout its estate of 750 pubs."

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The Portman Group aims to promote responsible drinking.

The news comes three years after the Bury St Edmunds-based brewer found itself in hot water over its steamy new campaign for Abbot Ale, which attracted complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority.

The traditional wrinkled and double-chinned cleric was replaced by a slick new female model, lying in bed gripping the sheets in both hands behind her head, and was banned from the pages of the Mail on Sunday.

Company officials said the campaign had been designed to attract younger drinkers to the brand by an all-woman team, insisting their intentions were not to offend.

And they added the original image, which featured the ancient abbey at Bury in the background, had become old-fashioned.

The company's actions were applauded by enthusiasts at Camra - The Campaign for Real Ale - who said it was important for brands to keep up with the times.

But many EADT readers were less impressed, with the letters page filled with comments such as: "I find the advertisements with their thinly-veiled sexual content very offensive."

A spokeswoman for Greene King said yesterday: "It was a very successful campaign and it was extremely well received, and now we are doing something different."

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