Five ethical Suffolk companies helping to save the planet

Businesswoman Jo Salter, of Where Does It Come From, launched a new collection of animal print Fairt

Businesswoman Jo Salter, of Where Does It Come From, launched a new collection of animal print Fairtrade scarves from India in 2015. They are now among her most popular items. - Credit: Su Anderson

We shine a solar-powered spotlight on five eco-friendly companies based in Suffolk that are run with ethical values at the forefront of what they do

Martin Myerscough of Frugalpac has launched of the Frugal Carton, following on from the Frugal Cup.

Martin Myerscough of Frugalpac has launched of the Frugal Carton, following on from the Frugal Cup. Picture: JANE MINGAY - Credit: Jane Mingay

Frugalpac

Martin Myerscough, from Woodbridge, hopes that his company Frugalpac will help cut the 2.5 billion coffee cups thrown away in the UK each year.

His aim is for his ‘frugal cups’, which are billed as the “first recyclable coffee cup”, to prevent thousands of tonnes of paper going to landfill. And ‘frugal cartons’ are due to launch next summer.

Natural candle by Arya Candles.

Natural candle by Arya Candles. - Credit: Archant

Arya Candles

Mother and daughter team Lina and Jenny Hogg, based near Cretingham, hand make natural rapeseed wax candles, scented with essential oils, through their company Arya Candles. Arya’s butterfly logo, with a woman’s silhouette, links to the ethical aims they have incorporated in their fledgling business - sponsoring women in former war torn countries around the world.


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Arya candles provide funds for Women for Women international, which supports women through a year-long program in countries such as Congo, Rwanda, and Bosnia.

Ipswich businesswoman Jo Salter with one of the new African tunis, fully traceable, which she is pla

Ipswich businesswoman Jo Salter with one of the new African tunis, fully traceable, which she is planning to launch with the support of Crowdfunding. Where Does It Come From? is an ethical clothing brand. - Credit: Where Does It Come From?

Where Does It Come From?

Ipswich-based ethical clothing company Where Does It Come From? enables every item of clothing bought to be fully traceable to the person who made it.

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Entrepreneur Jo Salter is building a reputation for her brand which is based on fully traceable, fair trade clothes direct from India. Now she has been busy finding partners to develop a new line in clothes from Africa, linking with cotton farmers in Uganda and a tailoring co-operative in Malawi.

Lucy McGoogan of Lowtoxbox

Lucy McGoogan of Lowtoxbox - Credit: Archant

LOWTOXBOX

Bury Saint Edmunds start up LOWTOXBOX provides a monthly delivery of eight handpicked items, such as natural skin care products, healthy foods and snacks, and organic cleaning products. Director Lucy McGoogan explained: “We only source from ethical suppliers whose business practices do not harm people, animals or the planet - sourcing Fairtrade, organic, natural, eco-friendly, cruelty-free products from large well-known companies to small independent brands and delivering them right to your door.”

The Eco Furniture team with one of their 100% recycled benches. Back, from left: Paul Winterflood, S

The Eco Furniture team with one of their 100% recycled benches. Back, from left: Paul Winterflood, Shaun Payne, Paul Richmond, Jason Fiddaman, Jason English and Paul Pester. Front, from left: Michael Earthroll, Kirsty Vale and Tony Bright. Picture: REALISE FUTURES - Credit: Realise Futures

Eco Furniture

Ipswich-based Eco Furniture is playing its part in keeping waste plastic away from landfill sites, and also has a social mission to support people who are disadvantaged and/or disabled. Its furniture and play equipment from recycled plastic planks is shipped all over the country.

The firm has also made bins and planters for Colchester Zoo, a play tractor at Jimmy’s Farm, an Anglo-Saxon long boat for the play area of the Suffolk heritage site Sutton Hoo, as well as play galleon ships and cars for schools and councils.

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