The five scams to watch out for in Suffolk right now

Suffolk County Council have previously run 'scamnesty' campaigns - to collect and remove as much sca

Suffolk County Council have previously run 'scamnesty' campaigns - to collect and remove as much scam mail as possible from people's post. in 2019 the scams Trading Standards are hilighting often come via email and over the phone Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Sarah Lucy brown

Criminals are trying ever more devious tactics to steal your personal information and money – here is a list of the scams troubling Suffolk right now.

Police have urged vigilance after an increase in the number of scammers impersonating Thomas Cook st

Police have urged vigilance after an increase in the number of scammers impersonating Thomas Cook staff following the company going bust Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto/HIGHWAYSTARZ-PHOTOGRAPHY - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

While some cons are fleeting and quickly addressed by authorities, others are long-standing and hard to eradicate.

A spokesman for Suffolk Trading Standards said these are the current scams the organisation is seeing frequently:

1. Scam Thomas Cook calls

A caller will claim to be from Thomas Cook and tell the victim they can refund the recipient's holiday payment.

The phishing scam is designed to steal personal information and bank details. You should be wary of

The phishing scam is designed to steal personal information and bank details. You should be wary of any emails asking you to take urgent action Picture: TRADING STANDARDS - Credit: Trading Standards

They then go on to ask for bank card details including the 3-digit code on the back.

2. PayPal phishing email

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Scammers send fake email stating that a new browser or device has attempted to access your PayPal account.

Below there will be a link that takes you to a fake website that asks for your log in details.

Phone pop-ups and links in emails will often try and make you believe you need to hand over money or

Phone pop-ups and links in emails will often try and make you believe you need to hand over money or personal details to reclaim control of your phone Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/NICO EL NINO/NICHOLAS HERRBACH - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

3. Scam Suffolk County Court calls

A fraudster will call and say they are from Suffolk County Court and that the recipient has been fined for a common issue, such as a parking charge notice, and must pay over the phone, or further action will be taken.

This pressure tactic is used to force a victim into acting before having a chance to consider whether they are talking to the correct person.

4. HMRC scam calls

This is a persistent scam that Suffolk Trading Standards regularly hear about.

The caller will claim that the victim owes the government tax and threatens the recipient with the police or an arrest warrant.

5. Scam Amazon Prime calls

This is the newest scam Trading Standards are receiving reports of.

The calls are pre-recorded messages stating that your Amazon Prime subscription is due to renew and you are asked to press 1 is you wish to talk to an advisor to alter or cancel.

The spokesman added: "Our advice is to never give any personal information out to anyone who calls out of the blue.

"Hang up the phone, and if you have concerns about whether the call might be genuine, find the number of the real company and call them from a different phone, or wait at least five minutes before calling from the same telephone.

"Never click on the links in emails.

"Instead go to your browser and type in the company website address and log on."

Report all scams to Trading Standards via Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 040506.

'Do not accept that someone is genuine - give yourself five minutes'

The police are also urging the public to take every care they can to keep themselves protected against scams, with the most consistent piece of advice being to take a moment before agreeing to hand over any details or money.

DS Simon Sharp said: "Do not accept that someone is from a trusted source just because they have your personal details. Do not just accept someone is genuine because the have your name our address on the phone.

"Put down the phone, give yourself five minutes to think about what you've been told on the phone, and don't agree to give over any personal information or money when you are called.

"Fraud in Suffolk is a similar picture to fraud cases across the country, but it can affect older people and younger people using different technology.

"Many older people will have a landline and those can be used for scams where a caller might impersonate a trusted source like HMRC.

"Just because someone can tell you your name and address or other details does not make them genuine."