Crash victim with brain injury says skydive ‘shows how far I’ve come’ in recovery

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

Daring to do a skydive at several thousand feet would be enough of a challenge for anyone. However for brave Georgia Wood, the few steps she took out of a plane really were a giant leap - as it marked just how far she has come in recovering from a devastating crash which left her severely brain damaged.

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

Just two years ago, Georgia was in hospital unable to walk or talk after the vehicle she was travelling left the road in Hasketon, near Woodbridge, and ended up in a 12ft ditch.

MORE: Teenager with severe brain injury after crash into 12ft ditch rebuilds her life

The crash left her with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), one of the most serious head injuries which damaged the pathways in her brain and meant she had to re-learn how to do even the most simple of tasks, such as tying her own hair in a ponytail.

She had been in a coma for 26 days due to the severity of her injuries, with doctors not sure she would even survive - let alone speak and move around by herself.

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

However in a remarkable show of determination, Georgia has slowly but surely learned how to walk and talk again with intensive physiotherapy - even if in her own words she is still a bit "wobbly".

Now she has showed just how remarkable her recovery has been by doing in a scary skydive at Ellough Airfield, near Beccles, to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance (EAAA).

Georgia, now aged 19, said falling out of the plane and somersaulting through the air was "terrifying" but that she loved the experience.

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"It made me feel proud of where I've come and that I was able to do that after what happened," she said.

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

"It was a really good feeling. I felt so elated all day."

MORE: Crash victim left with severe brain injury calls for road law changes

The EAAA helped save Georgia's life but, because it does not have the funding to fly a helicopter at night, had to drive her at high speed down the A14 to Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge.

The reason Georgia, of Warren Hill Road, Woodbridge, wanted to do the skydive was to raise funds to help them towards becoming a 24-hour service.

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

She has already raised more than £3,000 for the cause - but is already keen to do another skydive.

To donate to her cause, visit her JustGiving page here.

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERA

Georgia Wood did a skydive to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Picture: KARL THACKERAY/UK PARACHUTING BECCLES - Credit: Archant

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