Darts legend hits bullseye in film debut

FLEDGLING film director Lee Pavey has tipped darts legend Bobby George to hit the bullseye in the acting world.Pavey, 25, gave the veteran sports star his acting debut in British gangster movie Dog, which is being touted to film distributors in the UK.

By Jonathan Barnes

FLEDGLING film director Lee Pavey has tipped darts legend Bobby George to hit the bullseye in the acting world.

Pavey, 25, gave the veteran sports star his acting debut in British gangster movie Dog, which is being touted to film distributors in the UK.

He was thrilled by the 57-year-old's performance as gang boss Tony "The Butcher" Barton and predicted great things for the oche ace's new career.


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"Bobby was fantastic – one of the highlights of the film. He gave me 100% and it was hilarious to work with him," said Pavey, who wrote and directed the stylish low-budget film.

"He was nervous at the start because it was his first film but he got more and more confident and he came alive – he was flying by the end.

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"He is always going to get compared to Vinnie Jones and I would love to cast them together in a film – Bob could be Vinnie's dad.

"But he's his own man. He doesn't have to compare himself to anyone – he's Bobby George and he's got a lot to offer. I can see him on EastEnders in six months."

George, from Ardleigh, near Colchester, saw the film for the first time at a sales screening at the plush Charlotte Hotel in London last week and gave it the thumbs-up.

"I'm not sure whether I was any good. I was just me, really, but a bit more nasty. If anybody upset me, I put them in a meat pie," he said.

"Now I can say I've been in a movie, I've done it. It was brilliant fun to do, though it was real hard work. I don't know if I'll do another one. I just wish I was 30 years younger."

The film, which cost just £160,000 to make, also stars former Hollyoaks actor Paul Danan and Billy Murray, who starred in The Bill.

It boasts cameo appearances from top restaurateur Aldo Zilli as a burger van seller and Ray Stubbs, the BBC sports presenter, who plays Barton's mute minder Mick the Mouth.

Pavey, who recently directed his first television commercial, convinced George to appear in his part-time project in 2000.

"We had interviewed gangsters for the Tony Barton role and actors who thought they could do it," he said.

"My mum called me one day and told me to put BBC2 on. Bobby was talking about the darts, he said two words and that was it. I thought 'that's the man'.

"I went to George Hall, spent the afternoon with him, got drunk and Bobby said 'you're alright by me, I'll do it'."

The director is now hoping a distributor takes a chance on the 90-minute film so it can be shown in cinemas across the UK.

"I'm hoping they see the potential in it. I just want it to be seen, it's not going to win an Oscar, it's just meant to entertain.

"People who have seen it asked how many million it costs, but all we had was £160,000. No-one helped us and as a first- time director you don't get much money.

"The reaction has been good so far. It's just a comedy, something to watch with your mates. For the money and the time we had, I think we've made a good film."

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