DJ Peel opens new health facility

LEGENDARY disc jockey John Peel has opened a new facility at West Suffolk Mind in a bid to promote the use of music and the arts in helping people with mental health issues.

LEGENDARY disc jockey John Peel has opened a new facility at West Suffolk Mind in a bid to promote the use of music and the arts in helping people with mental health issues.

The BBC Radio 1 and Radio 4 DJ visited the Bury St Edmunds-based charity yesterdayand looked around the converted cellar, which will house music, arts and crafts workshops.

Mr Peel, who lives near Stowmarket, said: "I think this is a very worthwhile project, they seems to be a very good space for the use of the arts and I hope it will be well used.

"It has been shown time and time again that music can help and benefit people with mental health issues."

The charity's area manager Sue Jay said it was always their intention to turn their vacant cellar into something more rewarding.

She said: "Arts and music can be very therapeutic for people suffering from mental distress.

Most Read

"A lot of people are able to express their feelings through these mediums and to have someone like John Peel opening the facility gives it a massive boost."

The facility, including space for performing and a music room, was paid for by a massive £75,000 grant from the St Edmunds Trust.

Dr Richard Hamshere , trustee of St Edmunds Trust, said: "I was very impressed with the work West Suffolk Mind does and I am very impressed with what they have done with this facility."

Locally run and financed, West Suffolk Mind provides a number of professionally run services for people with mental health issues.

These include day centres, supported housing and support and self-help groups throughout west Suffolk.

Meanwhile, the Mayor of St Edmundsbury David Lockwood has officially opened the new premises of Workwise employment training centre, in Morton Hall, Bury St Edmunds.

Workwise is designed to provide work-based rehabilitation for adults who are recovering from various forms of mental illness.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter