DNA could solve 25 year old murder

ADVANCES in DNA technology could finally trap the killer of a leading Suffolk scientist whose murder has baffled detectives for more than 25 years.Officers from Grampian Police say they are hopeful that the net is closing around the killer of Dr Brenda Page, 32, who was murdered in July 1978.

ADVANCES in DNA technology could finally trap the killer of a leading Suffolk scientist whose murder has baffled detectives for more than 25 years.

Officers from Grampian Police say they are hopeful that the net is closing around the killer of Dr Brenda Page, 32, who was murdered in July 1978.

She was found in a pool of blood in her flat in Aberdeen, where she worked in the genetics department of the city's university.

The popular former pupil at Northgate School in Ipswich, had been battered to death.


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Despite a massive murder hunt, Dr Page's killer has escaped capture for more than a quarter of a century.

But that could now change because police believe developments in DNA testing are set to reveal vital clues in evidence from the crime scene.

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Speaking to the EADT last night, Dr Page's only sister, Rita Ling, welcomed the news and said she hoped it could bring an end to the family's 26-year nightmare.

Mrs Ling, from Ipswich, said: "This brings it all back and rakes up old memories but, if something can come of it then all well and good. It would be nice to think that someone could pay for it."

Mrs Ling, 70, added: "My mother never got over what happened to Brenda. I felt dreadful as well - it's just not something you would ever dream could happen to someone so close.

"She was a strong, healthy girl - not a little weakling. You can't draw a line under it when it's all up in the air.

"You just keep wondering what happened and going over things in your mind trying to work it out."

Remembering her sister, Mrs Ling said: "We knew she was bright from the very beginning but she was also a kind and caring girl.

"We were all very proud of her. She was dedicated to her work - and who knows what she could have achieved?"

Beryl Sims, an old school-friend of Dr Page, said: "Everybody was devastated when she was murdered and I would like to get justice for her.

"It was so unfortunate that nobody was ever caught for what happened. I want to see justice."

The new twist in the drama comes after a cold case review of the circumstances surrounding the murder by police, and a Grampian television documentary on prominent unsolved crimes.

Det Supt Brian Yule, of Grampian Police, said: "We have the original stains and marks taken from the crime scene.

"They are being submitted for DNA examination using technology that wasn't available in 1978 and we are hopeful that we will get a result from that."

Police are set to send a fresh report to prosecutors - which could finally see Dr Page's killer captured and brought to justice.

Det Supt Keith Wilkins said: "We've been in dialogue with the Procurator Fiscal over recent months on this, and at the end of our enquiries we will be back in touch there to provide a report and an update."

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