Armistice centenary - Region to mark 100 years since guns fell silent

School children turn out for a special Remembrance Service in Christchurch Park organised by Royal B

School children turn out for a special Remembrance Service in Christchurch Park organised by Royal British Legion Picture: PAUL NIXON - Credit: PAUL NIXON

On Sunday the world will fall silent for two minutes to mark one of the most poignant moments in world history – when the guns fell silent at the end of the First World War.

The Eve of Peace Armistice service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral in Bury St Edmunds Picture: RACHEL ED

The Eve of Peace Armistice service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral in Bury St Edmunds Picture: RACHEL EDGE - Credit: Archant

This is marked on Remembrance Sunday every year – but this year it has an extra meaning as it is the centenary of the end of the first genuinely global conflict.

People from communities across Suffolk and Essex will come together to mark the anniversary of the Armistice – at huge gatherings in Christchurch Park in Ipswich or in small congregations in village churches or at local war memorials.

The courage of former soldiers and the horror of battlefield deaths have been recalled by Suffolk’s bishops on the eve of Remembrance Sunday.

The Rt Rev Martin Seeley, Bishop of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich, and the Rt Rev Mike Harrison, Bishop of Dunwich, are taking part in commemorations throughout the county.

Mark Brennan with children from Hadleigh Community Primary School Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Mark Brennan with children from Hadleigh Community Primary School Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Archant


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Bishop Martin will be at the Ipswich Cenotaph service in Christchurch Park on Sunday. He said: ‘‘Everywhere I go in Suffolk there are extraordinary acts of Remembrance, in schools, churches and community centres, with a powerful profusion of poppies cascading across our county.

“In each place people are connecting with stories of someone in their family or community who fought in the Great War.

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“I am struck by what these stories tell us about qualities of courage and sacrifice, of selflessness and endurance, of looking out for each other – friend and stranger – and pulling together.

“They are qualities that sustained and strengthened our communities through the appalling experiences of the Great War, and they are qualities for us to treasure today.”

There have already been many events to mark the centenary across the area – including the Eve of Peace service at St Edmundsbury Cathedral and the Suffolk War Project that saw schools from across the county placing poppies on war graves in local cemeteries on Thursday.

We will be covering some ceremonies which will be featured online and in Monday’s papers – but we cannot be everywhere. If you want your event to be included please send a large file picture and a short description to Paul Geater.

Are you looking for a service to attend? Here are details of some of the ceremonies around the area.

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