How many Suffolk pupils tested positive on school return?

More pupils will be returning to school from September. Picture: IPSWICH ACADEMY

Suffolk pupils returned to school this week - Credit: Archant

Suffolk education leaders have said the return of pupils to the classroom last week from the Covid-19 lockdown has been largely positive, after first week data indicated the majority were back in the classroom.

Chiefs said it was a "watershed moment" in the coronavirus saga, as end-of-week figures revealed 97% of primary pupils were back while 92% in secondary schools had returned.

Data collated by the Department for Education covered 80,000 of Suffolk's 100,000 school-age population.

It reported that testing in schools, mostly secondary schools, had found 47 positive cases.

Suffolk County Council assistant director for education and learning, Adrian Orr, said students who

Adrian Orr, assistant director for education and teaching at Suffolk County Council - Credit: Suffolk County Council

Those pupils are now self-isolating, while a further 50 pupils were isolating as a precaution after coming into contact with those pupils.


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Adrian Orr, assistant director for education and teaching at Suffolk County Council, said: "It's gone incredibly well.

"I think this is a watershed moment where we would test if there were families that had the reluctance and hesitancy that we saw back in September, with some pretty mixed figures for some schools.

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"Generally, young people have returned, they are into lessons, secondary have been getting their testing regime, but I don't think we could have asked for a better start to school.

"It's a good three-week run to the Easter holidays but children are back in class, teachers are glad to be teaching them, and it is a nice sensible period to then have a bit of a break and that firebreak over Easter that nationally will be looking at the R number to see what the impact of the return has been."

Covid-19 rapid testing centres targeting people who unwittingly have the virus are to open in Haverhill and Lowestoft

Rapid Covid-19 tests are helping find positive pupils - Credit: Suffolk Resilience Forum

The council said that where before entire bubbles may have been required to isolate when a child tests positive, the size of those isolating bubbles are now smaller - because schools are able to quickly test pupils. Youngsters are also coming into contact with fewer peers.

Currently it is uncertain as to how long the testing in schools must continue.

At the county's special schools, around 70% of pupils have returned, but lower numbers were anticipated there.

The county education team has praised school staff for their part in the return - particularly when many hadn't had a break.

Mary Evans, cabinet member for education, recognised that parents would be frustrated that children who had tested positive would need to remain at home for a little longer.

However, she said it was important for the safe return.

"It's gone very well, we are incredibly grateful to all the work schools have done - they have gone above and beyond," she said. 

"The parents are really happy, and so are the children and young people.

Mary Evans

Suffolk County Council cabinet member for education, Mary Evans - Credit: Gregg Brownn

"We are aware of where the testing has thrown up young people with positive tests, and they are isolating. This is how we break transmission.

"For those parents, they must feel, 'oh no, here we go again' - but we need to do that and we thank everybody who has followed that.

"Everybody recognises now these are the steps we have got to take to get out of lockdown."

One primary school in Lowestoft has been forced to close a week after opening due to a "small number" of Covid cases.


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