Flowers maintain castle origins

THE grounds around Bungay Castle are to benefit from the planting of native wildflowers and shrubs in keeping with the castle's medieval origins.The work is being carried out by members of the Bungay Castle Trust with advice from Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

THE grounds around Bungay Castle are to benefit from the planting of native wildflowers and shrubs in keeping with the castle's medieval origins.

The work is being carried out by members of the Bungay Castle Trust with advice from Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

Bungay Castle was built in the 12th Century and was occupied until the early 16th Century.

It is likely that, in keeping with other medieval gardens of the time, it would have grown plants for culinary and medicinal purposes and incorporated native wildflowers.

“The new plantings we have suggested will not only provide a valuable insight into the gardens of the time, but will also be a valuable introduction to the wild flowers of Suffolk,” said Susan Stone of Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

Chris Reeves, of Bungay Castle Trust, said the project is a joint enterprise between the castle trust and Bungay in Bloom who will form a team to manage the site.

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“It is planned that when the plants are fully established an illustrated brochure will be produced describing the flowers and their uses in medieval times.

“We feel that these British plants will greatly enhance the castle area and prove of interest to schools and specialist garden and botanical groups,” he said.

Mr Reeves said he hoped the site would “throw new light” on the people who lived and worked in north Suffolk hundreds of years ago.

A mini orchard flowery mead is proposed beneath the apple tree at the castle.

A mix of cowslip, violet, selfheal, meadow buttercup, oxeye daisy, yellow rattle, barren strawberry and bugle will also be planted.

Next week a group of life skill pupils from Bungay High School will join members of the castle trust and Suffolk Wildlife Trust to plant the wildflowers.

A second phase of planting, shrubs and hedgerow plants is expected to go ahead in the autumn.

The scheme is being funded by an Awards for All grant.

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