Complainers trying to shut down live music are ‘spoiling things for the majority’

The Castle Inn, Framlingham Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

The Castle Inn, Framlingham Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN - Credit: Archant

A pub-goer has criticised those complaining about its live music nights saying they are trying to “spoil things for the majority”.

Framlingham father of two Alan Thompson said he had been angered to learn of the noise complaints directed at the Castle Inn in the town.

As reported previously, Suffolk Coastal District Council has been working with the pub after receiving several complaints about “loud music” and “rowdy behaviour” of patrons in recent weeks.

MORE: Castle Inn on the Hill faces complaints about loud music and rowdy behaviourMr Thompson said he had attended music nights at the pub and questioned how anyone living nearby could have cause for complaint.

With few other venues in the town offering live music, Mr Thompson said he was concerned such negativity could suffocate the town.

“The town is dying,” he said.


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“The Castle Inn is one of the few refreshing things about Framlingham.

“It’s attracting people from surrounding villages, where many of the pubs have closed, and they’re coming to hear the music.

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“But once again, there minority wants to spoil it for the majority.

“There are too many people in this town saying ‘we don’t want this’ and ‘we don’t want that’ and to be quite honest, I’ve had enough.”

Mr Thompson said he had become so frustrated with the attitude of some people in the town that he was now looking to move away.

Musician Steve Boyce has also raised concerns about the effect of noise complaints on pub hosting live music. “They are disappearing on a weekly basis and if the Castle went there wouldn’t be much left for live music in Framlingham,” he said.

A spokesman for Suffolk Coastal District Council said previously that the loud music had affected “many residents in the vicinity”.

“We have offered informal advice to the licensees and suggested ways they can reduce the noise from their music events, such as reducing the level of amplification, keeping doors and windows shut and adjusting the timing and frequency of the events,” the spokesman added.

“We will continue to monitor the situation and if there is any recurrence, we will review and one of our options could be taking formal action, but this is not something we are considering at the moment.”

The pub has not commented on the noise complaints.

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