Most Covid patients in hospitals being treated mainly for something else

Ipswich and Colchester hospitals, which are part of East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust

Ipswich and Colchester hospitals, which are part of East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust - Credit: Archant

A majority of coronavirus patients at hospitals in Suffolk and north Essex are being treated primarily for something else, it has emerged.

East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust (ESNEFT), which manages Ipswich and Colchester hospitals, and West Suffolk Hospital have confirmed fewer than half of its total number of Covid patients are being primarily cared for with the virus.

This is in line with the national picture, where 52% of the 3,023 patients reported as having the virus in England's hospitals on January 25 were being cared treated mainly for another condition.

Latest figures for January 25 revealed there were 100 patients with Covid at ESNEFT's hospitals, a slight increase from the 92 being treated the week before.

Giles Thorpe, chief nurse at ESNEFT, said: "We aim to treat our patients in the right place at the right time, regardless of the reason for their admission to our hospitals.

Giles Thorpe, chief nurse at ESNEFT

Giles Thorpe, chief nurse at ESNEFT - Credit: ESNEFT

"Every patient is tested for Covid-19 when they’re admitted and regularly thereafter so we can care for all patients, with and without Covid-19, safely – this is our top priority."

West Suffolk Hospital, in Bury St Edmunds, had 61 Covid patients as of January 61 - a fall from 82 from the previous week.

A spokesperson for West Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust said: "Our trust continues to experience high patient demand, treating a mix of patients - some primarily in hospital for the treatment of Covid-19 and some receiving treatment for a range of other conditions who have Covid-19. 

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"Cases of people with Covid-19 remain high in the local community and we therefore urge those who are eligible to get their Covid-19 vaccination.

"It is never too late to come forward for a first, second or third dose of the life-saving vaccine, with data showing that two weeks after getting a booster, you are 89% less likely to end up in hospital than if you are unvaccinated."