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Human remains found in Sudbury are NOT Corrie’s, says mum

PUBLISHED: 18:52 03 September 2020 | UPDATED: 06:25 04 September 2020

Corrie McKeague, who went missing following a night out in Bury St Edmunds in 2016

Corrie McKeague, who went missing following a night out in Bury St Edmunds in 2016

Archant

The human remains found in a Sudbury river last week are not those of missing RAF airman Corrie McKeague, his mother has said.

Corrie's mother Nicola Urquhart has said the human remains found in Sudbury are not her son's Picture: ARCHANTCorrie's mother Nicola Urquhart has said the human remains found in Sudbury are not her son's Picture: ARCHANT

Police were called to the River Stour, near Meadow Gates and Croft Bridge, at around 4.35pm on Thursday, August 27 after bones were discovered by a wildlife ranger.

Following the discovery, Nicola Urquhart said yesterday that police had not yet been able to rule out that the remains could be her son’s – who went missing following a night-out in Bury St Edmunds in September 2016.

However, she told this newspaper today that the remains are not Corrie’s after she had contact with Suffolk police.

The gunner, from Fife in Scotland, was based at RAF Honington and was last seen on CCTV entering a bin loading area on September 24, 2016, following a night out in Bury.

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Despite a multi-million pound investigation into his disappearance, which included two searches of a landfill site in Milton, Cambridgeshire, he was never found.

Suffolk police has always maintained that the “most likely” scenario was that Corrie got into a bin and was emptied into a Biffa lorry and consequently ended up in the waste process.

MORE: Corrie McKeague’s mum says he may have left area last seen on foot

Meanwhile, investigations into the identity of the victim in Sudbury are continuing, police have said.

The expert analysis of the remains is ongoing and some initial forensic results have been received, these will now be developed and opportunities for possible matching progressed.

MORE: Experts work on DNA profile for human bones in effort to identify victim

Detective Chief Inspector Mike Brown, the senior investigating officer, said: “Detailed forensic investigations on the remains is continuing and, although progress is being made every day, as we have said previously, this will be a long and painstaking process to complete, as we strive to establish the identity of the victim.

“Such a complex investigation is a real team effort and I offer my extreme gratitude for all the expertise, knowledge and support we have received from various specialist and operational resources.”


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