Compost toilets with only hand sanitiser could replace park facilities

These compost toilets could replace existing blocks in Castle Hill, Dumbarton Road, Murray Road and Whitehouse parks

These compost toilets could replace existing blocks in Castle Hill, Dumbarton Road, Murray Road and Whitehouse parks - Credit: IBC

Toilets not plugged into sewerage could be coming to Ipswich parks, it has been revealed. 

Plans have been revealed to replace Castle Hill, Dumbarton Road, Murray Road and Whitehouse Park's toilets with disabled and baby changing composting toilets.

The WC's will use solar power to provide lighting and will not be connected to the mains water or sewerage, Ipswich Borough Council has said. 

Hand sanitiser will be provided as an alternative to handwashing so energy and water use are further reduced. 

The compost toilets work by having two vaults, below the floor to compost, with each one used after the second one becomes full. 


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Urine is separated and drained away on the side. 

Councillor Phil Smart, Ipswich Borough Council’s portfolio holder for parks, said: “Access to quality public toilets is something that we know is important to park visitors and by replacing existing facilities with new environmentally friendly composting toilets we will be improving their experience while ensuring that energy and water usage is reduced in line with our wider climate change strategy.

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"Similar toilets are already in use at some of the council’s allotment sites and we think they would be a great addition to our parks.”

The toilet would pay for itself over time by saving on energy, water and sewerage costs. 

The toilet would pay for itself over time by saving on energy, water and sewerage costs. - Credit: IBC

Ipswich Borough Council’s executive will consider the plans to install composting toilets at a meeting on Tuesday, September 7. 

And if they give the go-ahead, IBC will approve a budget for the new composting toilets of £72,000, which allows for a higher budget of 20% over the estimated costs in case of unforeseen installation issues. 

The toilet would also pay for itself over time by saving on energy, water and sewerage costs, IBC claims.

It is predicted that replacing the current facilities with these composting toilets will also reduce carbon emissions by 1.48 tonnes per year – the equivalent carbon capture of 75 mature trees.

If all is agreed, the council will consult ward councillors and the four parks' friends groups to choose areas where the toilets could be installed.

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