Mass killer vows to clear his name

ON October 28, 1986, Jeremy Bamber was found guilty of killing five members of his family in cold blood. Despite a failed bid to overturn his conviction at the Court of Appeal in 2002 and an on-going assessment by the Criminal Cases Review Commission, Bamber remains imprisoned – and he has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison.

ON October 28, 1986, Jeremy Bamber was found guilty of killing five members of his family in cold blood.

Despite a failed bid to overturn his conviction at the Court of Appeal in 2002 and an on-going assessment by the Criminal Cases Review Commission, Bamber remains imprisoned - and he has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison.

But the 43-year-old has never stopped protesting his innocence. He spoke to EADT reporter James Hore.

MASS murderer Jeremy Bamber claims he no longer feels bitter at his conviction - but remains convinced his name will one day be cleared.


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Speaking to the EADT from HM Full Sutton prison in York, he said he wants the case to return to the Court of Appeal, claiming he has been a "victim of time and circumstances".

Bamber is serving five life sentences for killing five members of his adoptive family at their home at White House Farm, Tolleshunt D'arcy, in August 1985.

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His adoptive parents, Nevill and June, and adoptive sister, Sheila Caffell and her two son, Nicholas and Daniel were all shot dead in a shocking crime.

Essex Police initially thought Sheila, who was found with the murder weapon, had been responsible, before surviving members of the family convinced them that it was Bamber who had shot them all in a bid to secure the sizeable inheritance.

The force, which is unable to comment on the case because of the on-going review, was criticised for its handling of the investigation.

Having spent years behind bars, Bamber said he tries to remain mentally strong to deal with life.

He said: "There are times when I can't see the end, such as when the last appeal failed in 2002 and for some months afterwards I found it very difficult.

"But even in my lowest time I know that I am not responsible and somewhere along the line is the information that will prove that.

"I suppose I have felt very bitter in the past, but I do not feel that way anymore, it is not an emotion I allow myself, you have to be quite strict with yourself and not go down negative lines.

"Of course I have felt bitter and sorry for myself sometimes, but this is the life I have had and I look at it like that way - it is the life I have and the experience I have had.

"There are other lives equally as tragic and equally unjust - those who are run over and have a broken spine, or those who are struck down by blindness and I think their lives are tragic.

"I would sooner have the experienced what I have experienced than some other terrible tragedy."

Despite spending nearly 20 years in prison for a crime he says he did not commit, Bamber refrains from an all-out attack on Essex Police.

"Essex Police do a fantastic job, but they got it wrong with me.

"I believe I will be cleared and they will have to answer questions as to what happened and maybe there will be a public enquiry."

"It is not anger I feel now, I just am really looking forward to having another opportunity to get to the Court of Appeal and get to the truth with alibis this time.

"It is my contention that I have an alibi, we saw someone in the house when I was with the police officers."

While incarcerated Bamber spends a lot of his time working in the prison library as well as creating maps and books to be used by blind people.

After nearly 19 years behind bars he remains positive that one day he will be a free man.

"I cannot be responsible for whatever went on there, I am a victim of time and circumstances, but my experience has been my experience I have had.

"One does not know what will come next, who knows? It will just be great to have cleared my name and close that book and open a new one.

"Who knows what I may want to do, it will just be great to have an opportunity to make the choice, to do the simple things like have a choice of what I will have for dinner.

"What is overlooked by everybody is that I have always told the truth and said the same thing from day one to where we are now."

If the Criminal Cases Review Commission decides Bamber should be granted an appeal the case will once again be thrown into the spotlight, and even if it is rejected, one thing is for sure, Bamber will continue the fight to clear his name.

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