New owners of house frozen in time

A HOUSE that has come to be known as "the house where time stood still" has new owners who are preparing to renovate it.The three-bedroomed house, at Court Street, Nayland with Wissington, has been bought by Christopher and Claire Long-Price, who have now applied for planning permission to extensively modernise it, replacing deteriorating extensions at the back with a new extension.

A HOUSE that has come to be known as "the house where time stood still" has new owners who are preparing to renovate it.

The three-bedroomed house, at Court Street, Nayland with Wissington, has been bought by Christopher and Claire Long-Price, who have now applied for planning permission to extensively modernise it, replacing deteriorating extensions at the back with a new extension.

If the couple get planning permission the finished house will become a four-bedroomed home with a brand new kitchen complete with Aga, breakfast area, dining room, living and utility rooms.

A collection of wooden outbuildings will be converted into garage, guest accommodation and a studio.


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Barry Whymark, of Long Melford-based Whymark and Moulton, said his clients, the Long-Prices, had fallen in love with the house.

He said the couple, who had previous experience of renovating run-down historic property, would have invested more than £600,000 in the house, including the purchase price, by the time the work was finished.

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He added: "They don't care what they have to do to make it right. They fell in love with the village and want to live there."

Mr and Mrs Long-Price were under no illusions about what they were taking on, he said.

They had previously restored the Grade II listed Knowles Farm, at Great Horkesley, which was completely derelict when they bought it.

The timber-framed house in Court Street had remained unchanged for more than 50 years when it was sold at an auction in the village hall in March 2002.

Local developer George Braithwaite paid a cool £270,000 for the house, parts of which date back to the 17th century.

But when a survey revealed that it was in much worse condition than was originally thought Mr Braithwaite applied to Babergh District Council for planning permission to demolish it and build three new two-bedroomed houses in its place.

The application prompted a furious response from more than 80 local residents and the village preservation society, because although the house itself is not listed it is protected because the village itself is a conservation area.

Planning permission was refused last January and Mr Braithwaite put the house back on the market.

The new planning application is expected to be considered by Babergh's development committee on Wednesday, September 3.

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