No nukes groups back plant plans

ANTI-NUCLEAR campaigners are in the unusual position of backing plans at a power plant to update its facilities and build a new radioactive waste storage building.

ANTI-NUCLEAR campaigners are in the unusual position of backing plans at a power plant to update its facilities and build a new radioactive waste storage building.

Members of Bradwell for Renewable Resourcesand Mersea Objectors

, are supporting Bradwell Nuclear Power Station's request to Essex County Council for a specifically designed building to house intermediate waste, such as fuel debris, filter sludges and ion exchange resins.

The scheme is part of the decommissioning process.


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According to British Nuclear Fuels Ltd, the waste, which will all be generated on site, will be mixed with concrete and placed in 10-ton steel containers so that it can be labelled and stored safely.

Val Mainwood, from Bradwell for Renewable Resources, said: “We are very happy that the waste can be isolated so it can be checked and organised - it is the best option.

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“We have always advocated that waste should be packaged and put into blocks so that it can be easily monitored and everyone can see what's going on.”

Bobby Teague, from the Mersea Objectors, added: “This is just one of the legacies of nuclear waste. Lets just hope the county council ensures the new building is safe and robust enough to withstand severe weather and flooding, something that Bradwell is particularly vulnerable to.”

Bradwellpublic relations officer Robin Thorntonwas pleased by the support shown.

He said: “It's interesting how we are now beginning to get together with these groups and that most people are in agreement with us over this issue.

“Although this type of waste has been housed safely at Bradwellin underground vaults since 1962, the current facilities are coming to the end of their working lives and we have to plan for the future.”

Low and high-level waste has been dealt with safely in the past by sending it to Cumbriaand Sellafieldrespectively. However, there is no national repository for intermediate waste, meaning that it will have to be stored on site in temporary buildings.

Mrs Mainwood said: “This is where the problem lies - we are only here because current decommissioning is a mess, there is no final waste policy, there is simply nowhere else for it to go.

“What we don't agree with is that the buildings could be there for decades until a national depository is created.

“We would also like legislation to reassure the public that only waste from Bradwellgoes into the store.”

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