Patient goes to doctors in wheelbarrow

A PATIENT persuaded his friend to take him to a doctor in a wheelbarrow after he was apparently discharged from hospital without being provided with a wheelchair.

By David Green

A PATIENT persuaded his friend to take him to a doctor in a wheelbarrow after he was apparently discharged from hospital without being provided with a wheelchair.

Ian Holt, 40, of Framlingham, was discharged from the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Middlesex on Monday.

But after arriving home in hospital transport, Mr Holt said he found he had not been allocated a wheelchair in order to be mobile, nor had any care package been put in place.


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His friend, Damien O'Sullivan arrived yesterday from Ipswich to help him.

He lifted Mr Holt into a wheelbarrow and took him to the Framlingham Medical practice to have his wounds dressed.

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Mr Holt, who said he had a terminal illness as well as a broken back and two “shattered” knees, had apparently undergone a cartilage operation in the hospital and had expected to have a wheelchair and visits by carers after arriving home.

“It is disgusting. The last time I came out of hospital I was only able to manage with the help of neighbours and friends. Now it is happening all again,” he said.

Mr Holt said Mr O'Sullivan had agreed to stay with him to provide care.

A spokeswoman for the Framlingham Medical practice confirmed Mr Holt had arrived and departed in a wheelbarrow.

“We do have a wheelchair here for use by patients while they are in the building,” she said.

A Suffolk social services spokesman said Mr Holt had received occupational therapy in the past but the last contact with him had been on July 19.

“I can find no record of us being contacted by the hospital on this occasion and asked to provide back-up care,” he said.

The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital said last night there was no-one available to comment.

david.green@eadt.co.uk

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