Peter fights the sea and the council

By David LennardA MAN'S fight to save his home from the ravages of the North Sea is in danger of becoming wrapped up in red tape.Peter Boggis, of Easton Bavents, near Southwold, was determined not to stand idly by and let the power of the sea continually eat away at cliffs near homes in the coastal hamlet.

By David Lennard

A MAN'S fight to save his home from the ravages of the North Sea is in danger of becoming wrapped up in red tape.

Peter Boggis, of Easton Bavents, near Southwold, was determined not to stand idly by and let the power of the sea continually eat away at cliffs near homes in the coastal hamlet.

Earlier this year he began an operation at his own expense to bring in tonnes of clay soil to replace the area where the sea had made inroads.


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His efforts gained both support and criticism from residents, and planning officers from Waveney District Council got involved.

Mr Boggis agreed in March to halt any further work until he had obtained planning permission.

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In agreeing to co-operate with the district council, Mr Boggis stressed it was important there were no undue delays.

He was still hopeful of working alongside the district council, but has now admitted the delays were becoming more and more frustrating.

“The district council officers are insisting on a full environmental impact assessment on the work and that is an extremely complex procedure. I have a top firm producing this for me and we have reached an important first stage,” said Mr Boggis.

District councillors representing the Southwold area, including John Goldsmith and Michael Ladd, have supported Mr Boggis in his attempts to protect the cliffs and have been stressing to officials the urgency of the situation.

“I want to work alongside the district council and am not trying to antagonise anyone. It has to be realised, however, that every week delayed can cause more of the cliffs to be lost to the sea,” said Mr Boggis.

“I have always said that the situation is urgent and that action has to be taken to protect the cliffs.

“When I agreed to stop it was with the understanding that this urgency was accepted and I am continually in contact with district council officials about the erosion of the cliffs.”

A spokesman for Waveney District Council said it had a duty to be fair to everyone, including those who were in favour of the project and those who were opposed to it.

“There are certain requirements that the council has to abide by and these are being carried out. Mr Boggis is being kept up to date with what is happening,” he added.

david.lennard@eadt.co.uk

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