Pint-sized politico gets mayoral mandate from lookalike Boris Johnson

Nicholas Scott, four, nicknamed Boris by his dad, Alex Scott, with mum Wendy Scott, received a lette

Nicholas Scott, four, nicknamed Boris by his dad, Alex Scott, with mum Wendy Scott, received a letter from London Mayor Boris Johnson. - Credit: Su Anderson

Four-year-old Nicholas Scott may not have strong opinions on the EU – but he has something more obvious in common with the shaggy-haired Mayor of London.

Nicholas Scott, four, nicknamed Boris by his dad, Alex Scott, with mum Wendy Scott, received a lette

Nicholas Scott, four, nicknamed Boris by his dad, Alex Scott, with mum Wendy Scott, received a letter from London Mayor Boris Johnson. - Credit: Su Anderson

The Ipswich schoolboy’s chaotic locks won him the nickname ‘Boris’ among his family – after one of the country’s most distinctive and plain-spoken politicians.

Nicholas embraced the new moniker and made it known to classmates and teachers at Clifford Road Primary, where he was then cast as the ‘Mayor of Nazareth’ in the school nativity.

The determined youngster then penned a cheeky letter to Mr Johnson himself, pointing out their sartorial resemblance, and received a personally signed reply congratulating him on the well-earned appointment.

Mum Wendy said: “When we asked him what role he had in the nativity, he said ‘I’m Boris’.


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“It’s something we’d laughed about with him because of his longish blonde hair.”

On stage, Nicholas played a pint-sized parody of his mayoral lookalike in the nativity, entitled A Miracle in Town, complete with shirt, tie and trademark cycle helmet. He even rolled up his sleeves to help deliver the baby Jesus.

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Having won approval for his performance at school, he then received a letter of endorsement from City Hall.

Mrs Scott, a nurse at Ipswich Hospital, where Nicholas’ dad, Alex, also works in A&E, said the likeness to Mr Johnson probably goes no further than hairstyles. “I don’t think he has the same Conservative bent,” she added.

Sally-Ann Roberts, early years leader at Clifford Road Primary, where Nicholas’ seven-year-old sister Abigail also goes to school, said: “The idea came completely from Nicholas. We always ask the children which role they would like, and Nicholas said he wanted to be Boris.

“He got dressed up and delivered the message to Joseph that he would have to go and be counted – and then helped deliver the baby as well.”

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