Police issue image of road rage attacker

By Sheena WalsheTHIS is the man who stabbed a woman motorist with a four-inch knife in what police have revealed was a terrifying road rage attack.The vicious knifeman left the blade embedded in the victim's stomach after accusing her of "cutting him up" in her car on a quiet country road.

By Sheena Walshe

THIS is the man who stabbed a woman motorist with a four-inch knife in what police have revealed was a terrifying road rage attack.

The vicious knifeman left the blade embedded in the victim's stomach after accusing her of "cutting him up" in her car on a quiet country road.

Detectives released yesterday a computer-generated image of the attacker and said they believed someone must recognise him.


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They hope the picture will bring new momentum to their inquiry after revealing they were disappointed with the public response to initial appeals for information. Police said it is vital they caught the attacker and renewed their plea for help from the public.

Detectives said the 28-year-old victim, who is married and comes from Sudbury, was lucky to be alive. She is still in Colchester General Hospital after undergoing a three-hour operation, although her condition is said to be improving.

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She was driving her silver Ford Focus from Great Cornard towards Newton Green at about 8.15pm on Thursday when she noticed a vehicle following her with its lights flashing.

The woman – who has not been named, but who works as a carer – turned into Joe's Road to let the vehicle pass, but it followed her into the lane, continuing to flash its lights. She pulled over and got out of her car.

Suffolk police said the other driver also stopped, got out of his vehicle and accused the woman of "cutting him up".

He then stabbed the woman and left her bleeding with the knife lodged in her stomach as he drove off towards Little Cornard. The victim managed to stagger back to her car and raised the alarm on her mobile phone.

Detective Inspector Mike Bacon, who is leading the inquiry, said: "This is a despicable offence and all apparently over an alleged driving misdemeanour.

"Fortunately, the woman is making a good recovery and is in a stable condition and should be released from hospital in the next few days. However, this does not lessen the severity of the offence and our determination to apprehend the offender.

"She has been extremely brave after what must have been a truly traumatic experience and has been able to provide a good description of her attacker to enable us to draw up this image of him."

He appealed to the public: "I would urge you to take a good look at this and take time to think about whether you may know or recognise this man. He may live near you or perhaps he is one of your work colleagues.

"He may have come home on the night of the attack and may have been acting suspiciously, perhaps a bit withdrawn or quiet. He may even have had a small amount of blood on him or his clothing. Someone must know this man."

"For the sake of the woman now recovering in hospital, please think back to that evening and take a good look at the image."

The knifeman was described as white, aged in his early 40s, 5ft 9in tall, of medium build and with a tanned complexion.

He was clean-shaven, with short, dark hair and wore a dark, short-sleeved T-shirt, blue jeans and had a stud in his left ear. He was driving an old red hatchback car, described as being smaller than the woman's Ford Focus.

Detectives have warned all women motorists not to stop in remote areas, to keep all doors locked and to call 999 if they feel threatened or become suspicious.

Anyone who recognises the man or has information about the attack should contact the Suffolk police incident room on 01284 774344 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555111.

sheena.walshe@eadt.co.uk

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