Residents fear new homes threat

By Benedict O'ConnorRESIDENTS fear a town and a picturesque village could be swamped by 4,500 new homes. Developers want to build about 4,000 homes in Bury St Edmunds, against the wishes of the borough council, and up to 500 more in nearby Horringer.

By Benedict O'Connor

RESIDENTS fear a town and a picturesque village could be swamped by 4,500 new homes.

Developers want to build about 4,000 homes in Bury St Edmunds, against the wishes of the borough council, and up to 500 more in nearby Horringer.

Residents of Horringer, which is home to tourist hotspot Ickworth House, fear their village would more than double in size and become swamped by the development.


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As St Edmundsbury Borough Council consults on its revised local plan - which determines how land can be used - landowners and developers have applied to change the development status of fields and opens spaces, prompting outcry from residents.

Bert Biglin, Horringer parish and former borough councillor, said: “There is a fear in the village that we could be swamped by housing.

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“But the plan is only under consultation at the moment and there is a big public meeting about it. It would completely change the character of the village.”

Fellow resident, John Cannon, said: “Basically we all need to give these proposed plans a great deal of thought.

“Horringer is a true community and has so many active clubs and societies, busy all year round.

“The character of the village would be changed, flora and fauna would undoubtedly be threatened as would the whole rural atmosphere which makes Horringer unique.”

In Bury St Edmunds, developers have identified land between Compiegne Way and Great Barton as suitable for about 4,000 homes.

Jerry Massey, St Edmundsbury Borough Council environment director, said the revised local plan was out to consultation, which meant developers, landowners and the public who disapproved of its content could lodge objections and propose changes.

However, it will be subject to a public inquiry, beginning in October, and will be rigorously scrutinised.

“These are proposals from third parties objecting to what we have put forward and unless we have these consultations no-one will have the opportunity to put their views forward, which is why it is important for the public to engage in the process and make their feelings known,” said Mr Massey.

A public meeting is being held in Horringer Community Centre to discuss the revised local plan on Monday at 7.30pm.

benedict.o'connor@eadt.co.uk

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