Restaurant anger over signs row

AN EXPERIENCED restaurateur has hit out at council chiefs who have ordered him to take down advertising boards or risk legal action.

Dave Gooderham

AN EXPERIENCED restaurateur has hit out at council chiefs who have ordered him to take down advertising boards or risk legal action.

Barry Kappes was left fuming by the stance taken by Babergh District Council over The Case restaurant in Assington, near Sudbury.

The authority has told Mr Kappes he has two weeks to remove the large signs advertising his business or risk enforcement action.


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But the concerned owner claimed the move could dent his trade and even lead to staff cuts if the business suffers too greatly.

Mr Kappes, who has 35 years experience in the trade, said: “The signs have been up since 2000 and we had no problems with the council at first.

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“Three years ago these problems started and now Babergh has said these signs are illegal and that they have to come down or I face being interviewed by council enforcement officers under caution.

“I think Babergh should be more sympathetic especially at this time when so many businesses are going under. The signs are a vital part of attracting people to the restaurant and we would lose significant trade if they were taken down. This, in turn, could cause a reduction in staffing numbers.”

It is thought the two signs in question, placed outside the restaurant on the A134, do not comply with advertising regulations and need consent.

Now Babergh has threatened to initiate legal proceedings which would include council officers interviewing Mr Kappes under caution.

A council spokesman said: “Babergh recognises the need for local businesses to promote themselves. However, most people would agree that this shouldn't be a free-for-all and so this needs to be done in an appropriate and sensitive way - especially in a rural location.

“Babergh has been in contact with the agents of The Case and has suggested that the two large illuminated signs need not be removed, but in order to gain the necessary consents they do need to be reduced in scale.

“If they don't comply with this by January 2, Babergh reserves the right to follow its usual enforcement procedures which may include a caution.”

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