Search for Suffolk site to show off full replica of 1066’s Bayeux Tapestry

The scene in the mosaic showing King Harold Godwinson being shot in the Eye: Picture: MICHAEL LINTON

The scene in the mosaic showing King Harold Godwinson being shot in the Eye: Picture: MICHAEL LINTON - Credit: Archant

The year 1066 is probably the most significant in the history of England – and the events surrounding the Battle of Hastings were recorded in one of the most important documents in the world. The Bayeux Tapestry.

Michael Linton with the Guinness Award for the world's longest metal mosaic. Picture: MICHAEL LINTON

Michael Linton with the Guinness Award for the world's longest metal mosaic. Picture: MICHAEL LINTON - Credit: Archant

Now an astonishing mosaic replica of the tapestry has been brought to tour England – and its makers are looking for somewhere in Suffolk to show it off for a few weeks next year.

They are being helped in their search by local author Charlie Haylock who was bowled over when he saw it and is spearheading the search for a temporary home for the mosaic.

It was made by Michael Linton and his daughter Rachael at their home in New Zealand. The whole work – which is 64 metres long, weighs 350kg and has three million pieces of steel in it – took the Linton family 33 years to complete.

It has been touring the UK with the family since last year when they brought it over to Britain for the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings.


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Mr Haylock said that when he saw it he was determined to bring it to Suffolk. He thinks he has found one place to show it off in the county – but is looking for more.

He said: “We’d like to find somewhere to show it off in January and in April/May time. If anyone can offer anywhere I hope they can get in touch with the family.

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“There are a lot of links between Suffolk and the Battle of Hastings – and this really does tell its story well.”

He said that many people who had seen the original tapestry, which is on show in its home city in Normandy, feel the mosaic is even better to see the detail because of its vivid colours that have not had about 900 years to fade in the light.

Mr Linton’s wife Gillian said they were keen to bring it to Suffolk to give as many people in Britain as possible they chance to see the mosaic before they return to New Zealand.

She said: “It shows more than the tapestry itself. We knew there were some lost panels and we have tried to find out what was on them and complete the work.

“The extra panels took more than eight years to finish and add 72 feet to the mosaic. We would love more people to see it.”

Anyone able to offer a site to set up the exhibition could contact the Linton family through their website http://www.1066.co.nz/

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