Slaughterhouse plans

MORE jobs could be created if a meat company gets the go-ahead to centralise its operations at a new site.C & K Meats, which already employs 50 people, wants to convert an existing 22,000 square feet industrial building on the nearby Eye Airfield into a new state-of-the-art abattoir and processing plant in order to expand its operations.

MORE jobs could be created if a meat company gets the go-ahead to centralise its operations at a new site.

C & K Meats, which already employs 50 people, wants to convert an existing 22,000 square feet industrial building on the nearby Eye Airfield into a new state-of-the-art abattoir and processing plant in order to expand its operations.

It has submitted a planning application to Mid Suffolk District Council.

The company's meat processing plant is currently at Brome while the abattoir is at Earsham, near Bungay.


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The two premises employ a total of 50 people, who would all transfer to the airfield industrial estate.

Chris Burrows, who started C & K meats with his brother, Kevin, in 1994, said more jobs would be created by the relocation, initially only a few but the number was expected to rise year by year.

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"We have basically outgrown our current premises and want to expand," he said.

The company slaughters more than 70,000 pigs, cattle and sheep a year at Earsham and much of the meat is processed for the catering trade in East Anglia.

A few goats are also slaughtered and the plant further processes wild boar shot on farms.

The Earsham plant, which started operation in 1961 and was acquired by C & K meats three years ago, is thought to be the only multi-species abattoir now left in Suffolk and one of only a few in East Anglia.

More than 80% of the animals slaughtered at Earsham are reared in East Anglia.

Exotic meats such as ostrich, produced in Scotland, and kangaroo and crocodile, imported from South Africa, are also processed by C & K meats which has its own retail shop in Woodbridge.

"There is a demand for crocodile meat from some outlets but none of them local. It is a white meat which looks a bit like fish – I have never tasted it," Mr Burrows said.

He said there was a possibility that waste products from the business could be fed into the nearby Fibropower power station, which currently burns chicken litter.

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