Suffolk's star paramedics honoured

STAR paramedics working for Suffolk's ambulance service have been recognised for their extraordinary bravery and skills when faced with high pressure situations.

STAR paramedics working for Suffolk's ambulance service have been recognised for their extraordinary bravery and skills when faced with high pressure situations.

The East of England Ambulance Service honoured staff who have excelled in their roles at a special awards ceremony at Chilford Hall, in Linton near Cambridge on Friday.

Among the winners, nominated for 14 prestigious gongs were the shining stars of Suffolk's ambulance crews.

Singled out from more than 4,000 staff working across 130 different sites as well as around 2,000 volunteers were five paramedics serving Suffolk's communities.


You may also want to watch:


Carl Friar, who works at Ipswich ambulance station, was awarded The Chair's Award for his work in proactively engaging with the media and the public.

Writing his column in the Evening Star Mr Friar divulged his life as a paramedic, giving an insight into the day-to-day workings of the ambulance service.

Most Read

Also receiving a top honour, a Chief Officer's Commendation, was Paul Gedney for his work above and beyond the call of duty.

Last November Mr Gedney carried out a life-saving procedure he had never before performed on a motorcyclist.

The casualty was riding on the Hadleigh bypass when he was in collision with another vehicle. He suffered life-threatening internal injuries and stopped breathing twice.

Stowmarket based Mr Gedney discovered his patient's lung had collapsed and performed the procedure to release the air.

Despite having never performed the procedure he successfully helped to restore the patient's oxygen levels, stabilising his condition and following several operations at Ipswich Hospital, the patient has fully recovered.

Mr Gedney was hailed one of Suffolk's heroes winning ambulance person of the year in the Stars of Suffolk awards run by the Evening Star and Suffolk County Council.

A team of paramedics, David Sexby, Dan Springett and David Grover also received a Chief Officer's Commendation after attending reports of a teenage boy struggling in a pond in Jovian Way, Ipswich.

The crew helped in the search to recover 15-year-old Ashley Dorling, of Lavender Hill, attempting to revive him on the shore of the pond on Saturday, July 4.

Despite their attempts Ashley was taken to Ipswich Hospital where he sadly died.

Hayden Newton, chief executive of EEAS, said: “This awards ceremony gives the trust a wonderful opportunity to formally acknowledge the commitment and hard work of our staff, both on the front line and in other very important roles.

“Tonight has been about the people who stand out as going that extra mile beyond what is expected of them in their day-to-day role.

“Their work helps to improve patient care, the working lives of their fellow staff, and contributes to the success of the Trust.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus