Teachers’ pay rise will mean ‘less money to spend on pupils’

Teachers across the UK will receive a 2.75% pay rise as part of government plans Picture: GPOINTSTUD

Teachers across the UK will receive a 2.75% pay rise as part of government plans Picture: GPOINTSTUDIO/GETTY/iSTOCKPHOTO - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Teachers are set to get a £1,000 pay rise – but there are fears the increase could mean less money for Suffolk’s children.

Graham White, Suffolk NEU, says the pay rise could have negative effects on children Picture: CONTRI

Graham White, Suffolk NEU, says the pay rise could have negative effects on children Picture: CONTRIBUTED - Credit: Archant

Teachers and leaders in UK schools will see a pay rise of 2.75% above inflation, it has been announced.

It means that teachers will see an equivalent £1,000 increase to their salary next year, with leaders earning an additional £1,620.

The announcement comes following recommendations from the independent School Teachers' Review Body (STRB) and means minimum starting salaries for teachers in Suffolk will increase by £653.

But despite the good news, there are worries that more money for teachers means less money for pupils.

Education secretary Damian Hinds announced the plans on Monday Picture: STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PA

Education secretary Damian Hinds announced the plans on Monday Picture: STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PA - Credit: PA Wire/PA Images


You may also want to watch:


Graham White, spokesman for the Suffolk branch of the National Education Union, agreed teachers deserve pay rises.

But he said: "Firstly, it is not enough and secondly, it is not fully funded. It is very welcome, but nowhere near enough.

Most Read

"We'll end up with a situation where teachers get more money while schools have less money to spend on pupils - the real question is what is more important?"

Although the increase in pay is supported by an additional £105million to be paid through the teachers' grant, on top of the £321m already committed for the next financial year, Mr White believes a pay rise should not come out of existing budgets.

"Effectively, this means there will now be less money in schools," he added. "It is a horrible situation to be in, but there has to be enough money to go around to ensure pupils get the best possible education."

Announcing the plans, education secretary Damian Hinds said he had been inspired by meeting teachers and wants to highlight the impact they have on changing lives.

Mr Hinds said: "Today's announcement of a 2.75% pay rise for teachers, accepting the STRB's recommendations in full, means that teachers and heads can receive a pay rise above current rates of inflation and have more money in their pockets.

"If we want the best people working in our classrooms then it's right that we ensure their salaries recognise the vital nature of their work and the potentially life changing impact they can have on the lives of our children."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus