Turbine forces wind of change for show

THE new landmark wind turbine in Lowestoft will interfere with one of the town's other attractions – its annual air festival, it was revealed last night.

THE new landmark wind turbine in Lowestoft will interfere with one of the town's other attractions – its annual air festival, it was revealed last night.

Although the white 126m tall structure at Ness Point has been attracting admirers since it was finished last week by SLP Engineering, Brian Lewis, the air show's flight display director, said some adjustments to flight paths would have to be made now it was in place.

These may include the routes of the Red Arrows who wowed over 400,000 people at this year's two-day festival, the final event to be wholly organised by Waveney District Council.

"We will have to move the display a little bit further south which may make it difficult for people watching on the promenade.


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"I could have done with it being 100 yards further inland. It's something there will be briefings on," Mr Lewis said.

Meanwhile, people in the town have been giving their verdict on the new landmark.

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Graham Cook, general manager at Birds Eye/Unilever frozen foods factory at Whapload Road, said: "It's certainly different, isn't it? I think it gives a focal point for the town and gives Lowestoft an opening into that type of industry. In fact, I would like to have two or three myself."

But he raised concerns about road safety in Whapload Road if drivers start to stare at the turbine instead of keeping their eyes on the road, and any impact it may have on the air show.

David Holland, spokesman for Waveney District Council, said the issue had been flagged up during the planning process for the turbine nearly three years ago.

"When we put it out to public consultation, it was put in the planners report which the members based their decision on," he said.

Meanwhile, Terry Lynes, project assistant at the Lowestoft Heritage Workshop Centre which overlooks Ness Point, sees the turbine on his walk to walk every morning.

He said: "I have no objections to it at all, I think it's rather smart. I do feel we now have something to show our most easterly mainland point."

The turbine's 46m blades will start turning sometime this week during its testing and commissioning phrase and will generate enough electricity for up to 1,600 homes after it becomes fully operational in the New Year.

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