Videos & Gallery: Monarch delights crowds

CROWDS who packed into historic Bury St Edmunds today have spoken of their joy at seeing the Queen.

Russell Claydon

CROWDS who packed into historic Bury St Edmunds today have spoken of their joy at seeing the Queen.

Her Majesty was in the market town for the age old Maundy Thursday ceremony at St Edmundsbury Cathedral this morning and wowed her citizens by walking up to them to speak on leaving the service.

As she left the cathedral, decked out in an aqua green matching hat and coat, with black trim, a triumphant roar went up from the crowds at the south entrance.


You may also want to watch:


After pausing for photographs alongside the Duke of Edinburgh and four lucky school pupils from the town, she walked slowly up to the Deanery, stopping to chat to several different people along the lined path which was awash with Union Jacks.

People of all ages had turned out for the special occasion to get a glimpse of the Queen on her Suffolk visit.

Most Read

One of those who actually spoke to Her Majesty was Farid Ahmed, 55, of Bury St Edmunds.

He said: “I said 'morning ma'am' and she just put her hand up to me.

“It was very nice and I enjoyed it. This is the second time I have seen her in Bury St Edmunds - I was here in 2002 - I could not get close to her then but I did this time.”

Mr Ahmed, originally from Bangladesh has lived in England for the past 40 years and said he has a lot of time for the Monarch.

“I really like the Queen,” he said.

Sarah Denniston, 34, from Drinkstone, also spoke to her, which delighted her mum in Australia, who she called straight afterwards.

She said: “When the Queen visited Australia last my mum gave her a bunch of flowers so I promised mum I would make an effort to talk to the Queen when she came to Bury.”

Dressed up in a Norman costume, the historical re-enactor for Sutton Hoo, added: “We did speak to her and it was very exciting.”

Her friend Peta Cook said: “I said 'welcome to Bury and also a welcome from Australia'.”

Mrs Denniston, who is famous Australia cricketer Keith Millers' niece, showed the Queen a book about her relative and also had with her newspaper cuttings of her mum presenting the Monarch with flowers.

Topsy Bacon, 64, from Beck Row, near Mildenhall, said of the occassion: “It was wonderful. It was more than I expected.

“I will definitely be telling all my grandchildren about seeing the Queen.”

Her daughter Rachel Bacon, 23, said: “She waved at me and it was amazing. She stopped to turn around and gave us a wave.

“She is a good people person.

“It is quite an honour to think the Queen stopped to talk to people.”

Sophie Savage brought her three children one, three and six from Stowmarket for the momentous occasion today.

“It was brilliant,” she said. “We only really saw her hat as there were so many people in the way but that was enough.”

Due to the nature of the Maundy Thursday service, which dates back to the 12th Century and commemorates the last supper, some got closer to the Queen than others could only dream of.

Matt Barton, 13, from St James Middle School in Bury St Edmunds got the honour of carrying flowers alongside the Monarch during the ceremony and walking out of the Cathedral with her.

He said: “It was really good because she felt like a normal lady and was really nice. The Duke (of Edinburgh) was really friendly as well.

“She (the Queen) asked us lots of different questions about where we are going on holiday and things.”

Matt was joined by another pupil from St James and two younger pupils from St Edmundsbury Primary School.

He explained their role: “We carried flowers to make it smell nice like when Jesus washed the feet of his disciples.”

17-year-old Luke Derrett had the privilege of opening the Queen's Bentley as she left St Edmundsbury Cathedral following the service.

The Lord Lieutenant's Cadet from Stonechat Road, Ipswich, said: “It was great. I was not too nervous as I had a lot of time to prepare.

“It was a once in a lifetime opportunity really.”

After seemingly drifting away, the crowds returned for the Queen's departure following the reception at the Athnaeum.

Patiently they waited, with the steps leading up to the Angel Hotel packed and some getting the best views from the top floors of nearby buildings.

Finally, the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh stepped out of the historic building and were greeted with cheers from the watching crowd.

A brief wave to her Suffolk audience and the Royal party was driven off following a successful visit to the county.

It is understood that the Queen is now en route to Windsor Castle after getting into her private helicopter at St James' Middle School.

She is expected to spend Easter there.

Click here to buy any of the 155 pictures we took of the Queen's visit to BuryClick here to buy any of the 155 pictures we took of the Queen's visit to BuryClick here to buy any of the 155 pictures we took of the Queen's visit to BuryClick here to buy any of the 155 pictures we took of the Queen's visit to BuryClick here to buy any of the 155 pictures we took of the Queen's visit to BuryDownload and keep our FREE supplement - click here!Download and keep our FREE supplement - click here!

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus