Work to start on A14 problem

A LONG-standing problem on one of Suffolk's busiest carriageways could soon be a thing of the past as traffic chiefs prepare remedial work.

Dave Gooderham

A LONG-standing problem on one of Suffolk's busiest carriageways could soon be a thing of the past as traffic chiefs prepare remedial work.

Though admitting the work on the A14 was only a temporary solution, the Highways Agency last night revealed that permanent plans to solve problems with subsidence on the road were taking shape.

Community leaders welcomed the news after eight months of concerns about road safety following the multi-million pound improvements to the former Rookery Crossroads at Rougham, near Bury St Edmunds


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In December, the Highways Agency discovered that the subsidence problem lies with a drainage crossing trench, about three metres below the carriageway, which had a 150-millimetre deep void in it.

Overnight work will begin later this month with grout pumped into the voids under the carriageway to stabilise the situation and slow down any further sinking until permanent repairs are completed.

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Bury St Edmunds MP David Ruffley said: “I am pleased that the Highways Agency is now making some positive progress to correct the subsidence problem.

“Although we will have to wait for a permanent solution, I'm sure that motorists using the A14 through Rougham will be reassured to know that the voids under the carriageway will be soon be filled to provide a temporary solution to the problem. The Highways Agency has promised me further updates and I will be holding them to this commitment.”

Following extensive investigations to establish the nature and extent of the problem, the Highways Agency has also now begun preliminary plans for permanent repair.

Although no precise timetable has been released surrounding the permanent work, it is expected to be carried out before the end of the year.

A Highways Agency spokesman said: “Since the subsidence first appeared, our main priority has been to keep the road open and safe. But identifying a long-term solution has proved to be particularly difficult.”

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