Art of people watching goes on display

Here's Looking At You - the fine art of people watching is at The Town Hall Galleries, Ipswich until March 7.The faces, figures, and streets of Ipswich are portrayed in Here's Looking At You; an open exhibition by professional and amateur artists, and members of Suffolk Art Link, that explores our town and its inhabitants.

Here's Looking At You - the fine art of people watching is at The Town Hall Galleries, Ipswich until March 7.

The faces, figures, and streets of Ipswich are portrayed in Here's Looking At You; an open exhibition by professional and amateur artists, and members of Suffolk Art Link, that explores our town and its inhabitants. There's a wealth of expression, captured in a range of media; including paint, pencil, photography, embroidery, enamel, tile and bronze.

Young wannabe James Bond's, babes, and the Mayor all feature. Victoria Petchey's tiny watercolour of David Hale, Mayor of Ipswich, is in the style of an 18th century miniature; lending historical authority and a degree of wit. It's in sharp contrast to Belinda Armstrong's large acrylic on canvas of a baby Amelia. The painting is split up into areas, each painted with different hues; almost like a jigsaw cut up and restored. It's a bold, enthusiastic picture that speaks of youth and hope. Derek Chambers' Chinwe Chukwuogo- Roy, acrylic on gesso is a vivid portrait of a beautiful open-faced woman; lush of lip, big-eyed, and intelligent. The tiny detail of her plaits, earrings and scarf contrast with the vivid red background. An exceptionally well painted work.

It's interesting to see portraits in embroidery, fabric and collage, like Sarah Sherry's Judy; conventional in composition but exploring a different media. Hayley Lock's Somebody's Daughter, and Essex Gearl, collages, are not easily reconciled. They explore costume and history, and dazzle with their sequins. Julie Dodds' Inferno and Disguise, mixed media on canvas and velvet, are exquisitely worked and explore identity in an intriguing way. Totally superb.


You may also want to watch:


Delia Tourney-Godfrey's Along Dial Lane, and Along Dial Lane Diptych, both oil on board, are wonderfully under-painted, soft and impressionistic.

Hannah Frost's The watcher, photograph, is one of the most arresting images in the show. It's stark, dark and meaningful; a man with his dog on a hill. As much as this show is designed to focus on a town and its people it also focuses on everyman or everywoman.

Most Read

An interesting exhibition which the whole family can enjoy.

Sonia Carvill

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter