Jazz trio dazzles Cornhill centre

David Newton Trio, Bury St Edmunds Festival, Cornhill Walk, May 22 DAVID Newton is widely regarded as the number one pianist on the UK jazz scene and on the evidence of this concert those with such a view are not very far from a correct assumption.

David Newton Trio, Bury St Edmunds Festival, Cornhill Walk, May 22

DAVID Newton is widely regarded as the number one pianist on the UK jazz scene and on the evidence of this concert those with such a view are not very far from a correct assumption.

This was his fifth appearance at the Festival in the past few years, and it was by far his most interesting.

Soon after emerging on the jazz scene he first appeared at the Festival as accompanist and musical director for singer Carol Kidd, and then came a couple of appearances as pianist for the popular singer Stacey Kent.


You may also want to watch:


Newton's vast experience as an accompanist and as a member of both big bands and small bands has certainly paid off and, leading his own trio, he's clearly in his element.

It took him fully five minutes to get into the meat of his first number, Watch What Happens, as he extemporised until, apparently, deciding what to play and, almost by telepathy, the two other members of the trio, the experienced Andrew Cleyndert on double bass and drummer Sebastian de Krom, knew exactly when to come in.

Most Read

Newton explained that what was wonderful about jazz was that he could explore different avenues to take. It was, he suggested, like going for a drive into the countryside and taking different twists and turns before ending up somewhere pleasant. . . .a country pub, for instance! In th process of "getting started" he certainly came up with some quite breathtaking chords and delightful runs.

The appreciative audience seemed to agree and were delighted ro be transported on numerous different musical journeys, and so we were treated to Newton's interpretations of such melodic numbers as Don't Blame Me, Body and Soul and Tenderly with not one hackneyed phrase to be heard in any of them.

There were some superb solos from Cleyndert's deep and resonant bass and in de Krom, taking time off from touring with young Jamie Cullum, Newton has found a truly innovative and inventive soul mate.

The were probably at their best in There's A Small Hotel that de Krom introduced with an unsusual rhythm, using a soft mallet and brush on the different drums and cymbals. . . a masterpiece if ever there was one.

Newton's treatment of the beautiful and haunting, Emily, a tune composed by Johnny Mandel and featured in the film, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, was also pure delight, taken as it was in a gentle three-quarters time.

Over the past five years, the Cornhill Walk Shopping Centre has featured some of Britain's best musicians, including Martin Taylor, Jacqui Dankworth and Tina May, and this year, the David Newton Trio did more than maintain that extremely high standard.

Alan Crumpton

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter