Sunshine and Showers

Sunshine and Showers

max temp: 7°C

min temp: 3°C

Search

Review: Grow Up Grandad, by Gordon Steel, Gallery Players, Sir John Mills Theatre, until May 19

PUBLISHED: 12:44 19 May 2018 | UPDATED: 12:44 19 May 2018

Phil Cory in the Gallery Players production of Gordon Steel's play Grow Up Grandad. Photo: Dave Borthwick

Phil Cory in the Gallery Players production of Gordon Steel's play Grow Up Grandad. Photo: Dave Borthwick

Archant

After running the gamut of every possible emotion, the audience for Grow Up Grandad, will undoubtedly go home savouring their own individual and personal experience of the story. Performed by the highly skilled Gallery Players at the Sir John Mills Theatre, this delightful small cast play by Gordon Steel was premiered in the North East in 2015.

Phil Cory and April Rand in the Gallery Players production of Gordon Steel's play Grow Up Grandad. Photo: Dave BorthwickPhil Cory and April Rand in the Gallery Players production of Gordon Steel's play Grow Up Grandad. Photo: Dave Borthwick

Poppy aged nearly 12, comes to stay, reluctantly, with Grandad, and the core focus of the play is the relationship and interplay between these two characters, both of whom have to make enormous changes to their attitudes and lifestyles to accommodate each other.

From the outset, our senses are battered into submission by the dynamic Poppy, played so impressively by April Rand. She bounds onto the stage, with energy that does not diminish throughout, wringing out laughter and tears in large doses. She is charming and challenging and creates a vortex in the life of Grandad, whose character is bombastic and belligerent and at the same time caring and sensitive.

Crafted so cleverly by Phil Cory, Grandad’s time shift of 20 years from act one to act two is credible and very moving. Jo Lewis as grown up Poppy very competently reveals the pain of the loss of her mother, guilt and anger towards Grandad.

Much credit must go to director Steve Woodridge for his delicate handling of the content of the play and the challenges of the themes, as well as the crew for excellent staging, sound and light.

Get ready to rock in 2019 as the much-loved musical based on the music of Queen is coming to the Ipswich Regent.

There’s something special about a well-performed pantomime. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to Karen Simpson, from Bury Theatre Royal, about what makes this great theatrical tradition so successful

It’s safe to say that the Dreamboys received a grand reception at the Regent theatre in Ipswich on Friday night.

From rambling stories about dispensing sockfulls of change into an ATM to regaling the vagaries of living with a jazz musician, Irish funnyman David O’Doherty’s latest bonkers brand of comedy proved a hit.

With the Christmas season now almost upon us, our theatres are dusting down their stock of bad jokes, readying themselves for two months of festive fun. Arts editor Andrew Clarke casts an eye over the pantomimes seeking to entertain us this year

Gym goers of Ipswich are invited to a free workout with exotic-dancers The Dreamboys to raise money for Children in Need.

When you watch a comedian like Ross Noble, you’ve got to expect the unexpected.

Acting legend Sir Ian McKellen is touring the region next celebrating his 80th birthday and raising money for regional theatre. Arts editor Andrew Clarke finds out more about this ‘must-see’ event

Ipswich boy and Strictly Come Dancing favourite Robin Windsor explains how wanting to finish at the top of his game and the lure of a permanent natural tan convinced him to waltz into the sunset.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

MyDate24 MyPhotos24